[Skip to Content]

Register to receive the weekly OMFIF Commentary, on the stories behind global economic and financial news.

* Required Fields

Member Area Login

Forgotten Password?

Forgotten password

News
US interest rates normalising, Kaplan says

US interest rates normalising – Kaplan

29 Apr 2016

A gradual path to US interest rate normalisation as inflation rises towards the 2% benchmark was outlined by Robert Kaplan, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, in an OMFIF City lecture. Kaplan made clear he would back tightening if core inflation continues to rise.

  • Click here to read more
  • CCB and OMFIF sign strategic partnership

    CCB and OMFIF sign strategic partnership

    27 Apr 2016

    China Construction Bank, the world’s second largest bank by assets, and OMFIF agreed a strategic partnership on the renminbi's internationalisation.

  • Click here to read more
  • SDR could become currency in own right

    Chinese move advances SDR promotion

    25 Apr 2016

    China's plan to prepare a platform for SDR borrowing on its onshore market advances promotion of the IMF's composite accounting unit, but making it a currency in its own right will be a long journey with many hurdles, says David Marsh, OMFIF managing director.

  • Click here to read more
  • UK ‘immensely enriches’ European Union

    UK 'immensely enriches' European Union

    22 Apr 2016

    Europe irrefutably needs the Brits. We Europeans outside the UK have to do our best to convince them to stay in, say Marcello Minenna and Edoardo Reviglio in an OMFIF Commentary.

  • Click here to read more
  • EU poll could transform political system

    EU poll could transform political system

    21 Apr 2016

    The 23 June referendum could transform Britain’s party political system, says Meghnad Desai, chairman of the OMFIF advisory board, in the latest in OMFIF’s UK EU referendum series.

  • Click here to read more
  • 1 2 3 4

    Commentary

    • Chance of a lifetime

      by Kate Hoey in London | Tue 3 May 2016

      For the British, the European Union has always been at best an awkward fit. The UK has long-established and stable institutions, an admirable representative democracy, and a history and geography which give us a different cultural outlook from many on the Continent. The EU’s ambitions to become a state in its own right undermine the sovereignty and sense of identity that UK citizens share. Changing course is never easy. But this is a nettle we should grasp. We may not have another chance in our lifetime.

      MARKET: Europe

      OMFIF - HomePage
      View Commentary
    • Safety in staying in

      by Graham Bishop in London | Mon 2 May 2016

      I shall be voting to stay in the European Union on 23 June. With the leaders of the exit camp having revealed their reckless policies on our vital foreign trade, it is the only way to safeguard Britain’s economic future. There are three strands to the arguments for and against the UK’s EU membership – Project Future, Project Fantasy and Project Fear. If Project Fantasy turns out to be well named, UK citizens have every right to be fearful of the possible consequences.

      MARKET: Europe

      OMFIF - HomePage
      View Commentary
    • What a wonderful non-EU world

      by Stuart Wheeler in London | Fri 29 Apr 2016

      The world outside the European Union will be wonderful! That’s why the UK should leave. Outside we can take our own decisions. We have not been invaded for nearly 1,000 years. We have taught others how governments should work. Now we can be our own masters again. Why should we worry about entering a world where we decide for ourselves? Are we afraid they will be horrid to us if we leave? My message to British people who are proud of our country, as I am, is this: For goodness sake, vote Leave.

      MARKET: Europe

      OMFIF - HomePage
      View Commentary
    • Frankfurt: ready to help

      by Eric Menges in Frankfurt | Thu 28 Apr 2016

      If Britain decides to leave the European Union on 23 June, Frankfurt is a probable winner – at least in part. Some financial market participants would look for an alternative to London to maintain business models that require a European passport or single market privileges. Should post-referendum circumstances require professionals to set up in Frankfurt, we are here to help. We like the Brits and would be reluctant to see them depart. But if they go, they go. Before and after 23 June, Frankfurt is open for business.

      MARKET: Europe

      OMFIF - HomePage
      View Commentary

    OMFIF Chart

    ECB voting rotation

    by Ben Robinson

    At the 10 March ECB monetary policy meeting Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann did not have a vote, due to rotating voting rights introduced in 2015. The rotation along national lines raises the risk of members pursuing national interests in policy decisions. This may make consensus more difficult to achieve.

    ECB voting rotation

    Cost cuts and market share

    by Ben Robinson

    Despite substantial cost-cutting efforts, southern European countries have failed to achieve significant increases in export market share since the financial crisis, according to data collated by the Österreichische Nationalbank.

    Austria meeting

    Great Monetary Polarisation set to widen

    by David Marsh and Ben Robinson

    The Great Monetary Polarisation between the US and Europe is underway. The message from 70 years of monetary history is that, in the next few months, there is a roughly 50% chance of large-scale foreign exchange upheaval.

    Great Monetary Polarisation set to widen

    Chinese stock market fall sends worldwide ripples

    by William Baunton

    Bear market now gripping Hong Kong stock market too

    Chinese stock market fall sends worldwide ripples
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4

    Advisory Board View

    Britain 'better off' if it votes to stay

    We put two questions to members of the Advisory Board: 1) Do you believe Britain would be safer, more secure and prosperous inside or outside the EU? 2) With regard to the rest of the EU, would a British exit promote disintegration or integration? An overwhelming majority of respondents said that Britain would be safer, more secure and more prosperous inside the EU.

    Britain 'better off' if it votes to stay
    View All Polls